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Bipartisan Senate Marijuana Bill Details Emerge Ahead of this Week’s Filing

The Bill, or STATES Act, seeks to support states rights and exempt cannabis activity in legal states.

Details are beginning to emerge on the bipartisan Senate legislation effort to end the war on weed, a result of the deal between U.S. Sen. Cory Gardner (R-CO) and Donald Trump.

The bill, which Gardner is intending to file with Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) and other senators this week, reports Marijuana Moment, will be called the Strengthening the Tenth Amendment Entrusting States (STATES) Act.

The legislation, which seeks to support states’ rights, will amend the draconian Controlled Substances Act to exempt marijuana activity in legal states.

It also amends the federal definition of marijuana to exclude industrial hemp.

The bill “clearly states that compliant [financial and banking] transactions are not trafficking and do not result in proceeds of an unlawful transaction,” according to an overview obtained by Marijuana Moment.

“Swift passage of the Warren-Gardner bill defends the rights of the majority of American constituents living in jurisdictions that legally authorizes some uses of marijuana and safeguards the will of the overwhelming majority of Americans of all political ideologies,” reads a letter that advocacy groups endorsing the bill are sending to Gardner and Warren.

Strange political bedfellows all the rage these days

NORML has been working with the office of Senator Gardner on the bill.

“And we're working with a number of offices to make sure the language is going to be right and palatable to a bipartisan majority of the U.S. Senate," said NORML political director Justin Strekal.

Meanwhile…

Acting DEA chief Robert Patterson told the House Judiciary Committee that he was “aware of a few deaths from marijuana” among the 64,000 opioid deaths of 2016. What?

Within minutes, lawmakers bombarded Patterson with questions about his absurd and obviously untrue comment.

The DEA itself published a report in 2017, which noted that no one has ever died from a marijuana overdose, ever.

Why is lying so fashionable in Washington DC political circles these days? Silly question, I know.

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