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Utah Officials Concerned about Pot Shop on Its Border with Colorado

Utah officials are wondering if they might need a wall to stem the cannabis flow from a weed shop in Dinosaur, Colorado

Rocky Mountain Cannabis Warns Customers not to take Product into the Prohibition State of Utah

As the president told a Cabinet meeting on Monday that his wall is going to “knock the hell out of the drug flow” through Mexico, a mini border dispute is underway between Utah and Colorado.

Utah officials are apparently wondering if they might need a wall to stem the cannabis flow from a weed shop in Dinosaur, Colorado, three miles from the state line.

The owner of Rocky Mountain Cannabis, which recently opened in Dinosaur, dutifully posted signs warning customers not to cross state lines with its products.

A Utah Highway Patrol officer reiterated the warning: violators will be prosecuted if they bring or consume weed in Utah, the Deseret News reported.

Richard Blakley, Mayor of Dinosaur’s 350 residents who voted to authorize cannabis stores and MMJ centers, noted that crime rates have not increased in the Colorado towns with pot shops and that they have generated healthy tax revenues “that have been really good” for the communities.

But despite all this, Utah is nervous.

“I really think a big portion of their retail is going to be headed to our state, which I have concerns about…” said Scott Chew, Utah Republican State Representative.

“It’s no skin off the establishment’s nose if people buy it there and head to Utah,” he added.

One has to wonder: why is it skin off your nose if Utah residents wish to try a healthy alternative to alcohol and opiates?

After all, out of all 50 states, Utah had the seventh-highest drug overdose rate in the US between 2013 and 2015 and it still hovers in that area.

Utah teens are more prone to getting wasted on booze than their peers nationwide. Utahans, 60% of whom are Mormons, have lower than average alcohol consumption rates than other states, but unsafe drinking habits are just as common as in the rest of the country.

So perhaps, Utah’s lawmakers should stand down and let folks try a safer alternative.

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