DEA’s Annual List of Drug Slang is Officially Out and It’s Weird

The new list of slang terms for marijuana has been released by the DEA.

The DEA added over 50 new slang terms for marijuana since last year. Some are inexplicably weird. So enjoy, and have a good laugh.

“My Brother,” “Pink Panther” and “Plant” made the list for the first time this year.

The folks at the DEA are at least beginning to understand the concept of strains, Marijuana Moment pointed out, as several common strain names are included in the updated list, such as blue dream, green crack and train wreck, for example.

Oddly, the DEA is using the word terpenes as a slang word for weed itself. MMJ, normally short for medical marijuana, is also being used for weed along with the old-fashioned term “devil’s lettuce.”

“Prop 215,” the California ballot measure that legalized MMJ (medical marijuana!) in 1996, made the list as well. Why? Shoulder shrug.

Also check out: “a-bomb,” weed laced with heroin and “bazooka,” weed “mixed with cocaine paste.”

The DEA also lists three terms for cannabis laced with PCP (“bionic,” “wet” and “zoom”).

Here’s a full list of the DEA’s new slang terms for cannabis:

  • A-Bomb
  • Alfalfa
  • Almohada
  • AZ
  • Bazooka
  • Bionic
  • Blue Dream
  • Branches
  • Café
  • Cajita
  • Camara
  • Diosa Verde
  • Elefante Pata
  • Escoba
  • Fattie
  • Gallina
  • Garifa
  • Green Crack
  • Greenhouse
  • Hoja
  • Leña
  • Llesca
  • Loud
  • Lucas
  • Manteca
  • Mersh
  • Mexicali Haze
  • MMJ
  • My Brother
  • Nug
  • Palomita
  • Pasto
  • Pasture
  • Peliroja
  • Pink Panther
  • Pintura
  • Plant
  • Porro
  • Prop 215
  • Purple OG
  • Red Hair
  • Shoes
  • Sour OG
  • Sticky
  • Tangy OG
  • Terp
  • Terpenes
  • Tigitty
  • Top Shelf
  • Train Wreck
  • Trinity OG
  • Valle
  • Zip

For the record, pointed out Marijuana Moment, the DEA itself doesn’t come up with these terms. It compiles updated terms on all drugs based on “a variety of law enforcement and open sources,” according to the new report.

“It is designed as a ready reference for law enforcement personnel who are confronted with hundreds of slang terms and code words used to identify a wide variety of controlled substances, designer drugs, synthetic compounds, measurements, locations, weapons, and other miscellaneous terms relevant to the drug trade.”

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