Troubling News for American Jews: Still Number 1 Target of Hate While Indifference Grows

For all the talk about anti-Muslim backlash, Jews are still 28 percent more likely to suffer violent, religiously motivated hate crimes than Muslims. Some of that crime is at the hands of Muslims. By 2050, there are projected to be more Muslims in the U.S. than Jews.

If you want to ignite the flames of hate in the far left and the far right--at the same time on the same issue--while getting them both to agree, you need only mention "The Jooos." It's the one thing both sides agree on, and really always have.

Jew-hatred has been a constant in religiously-motivated hate crimes since the FBI started collecting statistics. Anti-Muslim hate crime only hit the radar screen after 9/11, which makes perfect sense. Now, with ISIS-inspired terror taking hold, anti-Muslim hate crime has spiked back up to 2001 levels, meaning that Jews only receive slightly more than half the hate crimes, versus about 90 percent in 1991.

On the victim-worshipping left, Jews are seen as defenders of Zionism (even when they themselves oppose it, but the group identity is more powerful than an individual's beliefs). They also suffer from the triple threat of being from a white, privileged, moneyed class that is seen as controlling banking, Hollywood, and politics.

In far-right nationalist pig sties, many of the same tropes are passed around as reason to hate Jews. The main difference is that leftists seek to protect Israel-hating Palestinians and other terrorists, while the nationalists would just as soon eliminate both groups.

It's not really news that Jew-hatred is still going strong.

But you'd think it's news given the media's obsession with backlash against Muslims , for crimes committed in the name of ISIS--and in fact lauded by ISIS. Every time there's an act of terror, you see the stories about "backlash." It doesn't help that Democrats run ads highlighting hate like the one Latino Victory Fund ran against Ed Gillespie. What you didn't see in that ad was a moving truck driven by a Muslim running down Jews. You didn't see the many times Jews are shouted down or voted out of campus organizations because of their religion.

*“Given that you are a woman and very active in the female community, how do you see yourself being able to maintain an unbiased view?”

“Given that you are black and very active in the black community, how do you see yourself being able to maintain an unbiased view?”

“Given that you are gay and very active in the gay community, how do you see yourself being able to maintain an unbiased view?”*

It is, however, okay on many campuses to ask "Given that you are Jewish and very active in the Jewish community, how do you see yourself being able to maintain an unbiased view?" While violent hate crimes against Jews, as a percentage of the total, have declined over the years, the instances of anti-Jewish bigotry on campus has soared.

In February, Barry Kosmin and Ariela Keysar of Trinity College released a reportbased on a survey of more than 1,000 Jewish students nationwide. Kosmin and Keysar note that in a 2013 Pew survey, American Jews ages 18 to 29 were far more likely to report being called offensive names than older Jews. But the researchers were still surprised by the results. A majority—54 percent—of respondents said they had been subject to or had witnessed anti-Semitism on campus—though that number could include a range of potential experiences, from overt bigotry to microaggressions.

As liberal colleges and universities turn out graduates steeped in this kind of selective victim mentality, where Jews, who make up less than 2 percent of the U.S. population, and are among the most assimilated religious groups in American history, are seen as oppressors, unworthy of protection, this view will filter into business, politics and law.

For all the talk about anti-Muslim backlash, Jews are still 28 percent more likely to suffer violent, religiously motivated hate crimes than Muslims. Some of that crime is at the hands of Muslims. The Muslim population in America is growing at a far faster rate than the Jewish population, and by 2050, there are projected to be more Muslims in the U.S. than Jews.

The question is, will the likelihood of hate crimes against Jews increase or decrease with the growth of a Muslim population? I'd say the answer is pretty clear--it will increase. The other question is, will the next generation of business and political leaders be more or less sympathetic to the plight of American Jews? That answer, sadly, is also clear--they will care even less.

Comments
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DLC
DLC

Gee, how can this be, with Drumpfs! benevolent alt-racists in the President's ear?

emptypockets
emptypockets

"Never"...isn't nearly as long as it used to be...

emptypockets
emptypockets

"Never again"...said with such certitude as the world had the horrors revealed to them in proof. But progressives [socialists in hiding] have been making certain education became indoctrination and many things stopped being taught.

mlindroos
mlindroos

But that's a rounding error! The proportion is roughly 2:1 in both cases, just like I said.

I personally oppose all kinds of hate crimes, but I would caution against extrapolating too much from the relatively small number of reported incidents tracked by FBI (or a non-systematic selection of press reports about hate crimes committed against minority group X which I happen to care very much about). The actual number of hate crimes is undoubtedly higher when you factor in unreported incidents, but is there a uniform bias? Probably not as e.g. non English speaking hate crime victims are less likely to complain to the FBI. This may also influence the reported ethnicity of hate crime offenders (see link ... sadly, religious affiliation is not tracked).

Steve Berman
Steve Berman

Editor

You need to go back and look at your demographics. There are around 6 million Jews in the U.S. and 3.2 million Muslims. The per capita numbers were derived from that. It's not 2:1.

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