The Resurgent’s Dictionary of Southern Words and Sayings

It might really be a Pepsi but in the south it's called Coe-Cola.

Summer is officially over.

By the end of the month, every northern state will be covered in three feet of snow.

That’s exactly why everyone who lives up there packs up all of their gear and heads down to Florida this time of year. If this happens to be your first trip, you need to be warned. It’s very important to know the language. Also, try to hide your devotion to Ohio State. They're not real popular around these parts. Trust me, the last thing you want to say when you stop for gas at Stripling's General Store in beautiful Cordele, Georgia is, "Where you guys keep the pop? I need some cold drinks for the big Ohio State-Northwest Manitoba game tonight."

Look, I can't help you with your poor choice of a team but I have a lot to offer when it comes to teaching you the southern language, more commonly referred to as, "American." As in, "Speak American! Where you from, Alaska?"

Thankfully, your friends at The Resurgent have got your back.

I give you The Resurgent’s Dictionary of Southern Words and Sayings.

Bawl - ball

This word can be used when talking about football.

“Let’s go to the bawl game, mama.”

Or baseball.

“Hit the bawl, John Philip!”

It can even be used to describe the way that a person cries, which can get really confusing if the person cries at a sporting event.

“Delbert was just a bawlin’ after Tennessee lost the bawl game.”

Ballyball - volleyball

“I like to watch them Brazilians play ballyball.”

Quipment - equipment

“I’d be done home by now if Floyd would ever get here with that quipment.”

People in the south love quipment.

Y’all - two or more people

Y’all’s - a whole bunch of people (happy)

All y’all - a whole bunch of people (angry)

“Y’all sit down.”

“I just love y’all’s lawn furniture.”

“You kids better shut up or I’m gonna snap and get everyone of ya. I’m talkin’ ‘bout all y’all.”

War War Two - The Second World War

“My Binky fought in War War Two and brought back some German coe-cola.”

Binky - Grandfather

See also Bo Bop, Papa, Bo Pop, Bo, Pop, Pappa, and Grin-dead-ee

Intendo - Any electronic gaming device that has ever existed.

“Y’all need to get off those Intendos and get outside. I’m talkin’ ‘bout all y’all!”

Apple Pie - moonshine

Grin-dead-ee’s medicine - moonshine

Coe-cola - Any soft drink. Also, sometimes another name for moonshine.

It might really be Sprite. It might be Pepsi. Man, it could even be orange juice. But in the south, it’s called coe-cola.

“That ol’ boy ain’t from ‘round here. He just called your coe-cola a pop.”

Fridge-rate-her - Refrigerator

“Shelly, get me some Coe-cola out of the fridge-rate-her. I’m in here watching the bawl game.”

Friends from the north, it is my desire that this small preview of our language helps you to better enjoy your time in the south. Just remember, if someone invites you to a bawl game, go. It’ll be a lot of fun. If you belong to a group that a local woman has just referred to as, “all y’all,” you’ve done something terribly wrong and you should get away as fast as you can. And if you catch a cold and someone offers you some of their, "Grin-deadee’s medicine", do not take it. By the time you wake back up, Ohio State will be off of probation.

I hope y’all enjoy your stay.

Comments
No. 1-11
etbass
etbass

In this part of the south, it is "coke". And everything that has carbonated water is coke, regardless of the brand, which includes, Pepsi, Coca-Cola, Dr. Pepper, Sprite, Mellow Yellow, etc. If you specify, Diet Coke, then we understand that you are asking for a specific product.

For example, if you are asked you do want something to drink, we have tea, coke, water? Don't assume they only have Coca-Cola, or that they even have the regular Coca-Cola. You have to follow up with a request for a specific type or ask what kind do you have. They may have Dr. Pepper, Pepsi and Sprite and yet still asked if you want a coke.

We do that with a lot of things. A weed-eater is a grass trimmer, regardless of the brand or size. A bush-hog is a brush mower, regardless of the brand or size and is also a verb, as in, "I am bush-hogging today."

Bill_NC
Bill_NC

I read a similar dictionary of Southern words more than 30 years ago. I recall from it: Sebmup (Seven-Up) Ratcheer (on this spot) Shovelay (Chevrolet) Ose (Oldsmobile)

I also lived in Louisiana for a while, and I remember: Wast (wasp) Dest (desk) Axe (ask)

Steve Berman
Steve Berman

Editor

Striplings has some really good deer jerky. Those carpet-baggers should try some and contribute to the economy besides just driving on through.

whatizreality
whatizreality

Jeet yet? Did you eat yet.

Veteran
Veteran

Awl - otherwise known as oil Salad - iceberg lettuce covered thousand island dressing and served with saltines

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