The Colin Kaepernick Solution

When last we checked in on Colin Kaepernick, he was unemployed and Disney-ESPN was concerned his joblessness was due to being blackballed by the NFL team owners.

Not withstanding the fact that he’s 29 years old with previous injuries, is statistically in the basement among current NFL quarterbacks, and his salary demands are extremely unreasonable.

Over the past few days, Disney-ESPN has been busy working through the relocation of General Robert E. Lee’s secret Asian descendant: Robert Lee, leaving a void the NAACP was only to happy to occupy. (CBS Sports)

The NAACP’s interim president Derrick Johnson has officially requested a formal meeting with NFL commissioner Roger Goodall to discuss NFL players and their ability to exercise their First Amendment rights. According to a letter sent to the league by the NAACP, the meeting will specifically focus on Kaepernick’s perceived “blackballing” by the league in light of his protests last season. It also questions the silencing of NFL players’ platforms, citing Tommie Smith and John Carlos’s black power salute at the 1968 Olympics, among other examples.

According to their own website, the NAACP mission is: (NAACP)

The mission of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) is to ensure the political, educational, social, and economic equality of rights of all persons and to eliminate race-based discrimination.

Maybe the NAACP isn’t concentrating on racial discrimination because: (Vice Sports)

African-American males are only six percent of the United States population, but comprise nearly 70 percent of the players in the National Football League.

If the NAACP had bothered calling any of that 70%, they would have found out Roger Goodall doesn’t hire quarterbacks. They could have been further educated on the fact that Mr. Goodall is in fact himself employed by those that do hire QBs, and certainly isn’t about to jump into this briar patch. But they can take consolation in the fact they beat Al Sharpton and Sheila Jackson Lee to the punch here. Kudos.

For all of their caterwauling consternation, the NAACP has zero chance of strong-arming the NFL into hiring Mr. Kaepernick. Emphasizing a First Amendment violation where none exist does Colin no favors, and equating kneeling with standing with a raised fist is thin gruel.

Enter Disney-ESPN. They and they alone can provide the solution to this Gordian knot, and help themselves out at the same time. It seems ESPN has a very real racial employment problem. Out of all the NFL analysts employed with ESPN, it appears only Andre Ware is black and a former NFL quarterback. Now that is patently discriminatory which must be rectified soonest.

Disney-ESPN should offer Colin a job as a NFL analyst PDQ. This will solve a whole host of problems which are pressing themselves into the American psyche. Having lurched so far to the left they make Bernie Sanders look positively moderate, ESPN can take a victory lap in front of an appreciative America. Appreciative because they will no longer have to hear about a millionaire’s employment problems.

With the Disney-ESPN platform, especially ESPN OCHO, Mr. Kaepernick can look forward to a vast loving audience in Cuba and Venezuela, if not here in the good ole USA. Good on him. He can drag out his Che Guevara shirt and rest easy knowing his girlfriend’s claim will find fertile ground south of the border. (Daily Mail)

Nessa Diab, the MTV host and Hot 97 DJ who has dated Kaepernick, 29, for the past two years, compared Ravens owner Steve Bisciotti to a slave master and Lewis to one of his captives on Twitter after reports revealed they had hesitations about signing the football-playing free agent.

Good times.

Colin’s salary demands should be no problem either. Disney can always make an animated movie documenting this sordid affair. “Kneeling While Black – The Colin Kaepernick Story” is sure to do better than Fantasia, and will no doubt be a cult favorite among the counter-protesting SJW set.

Win-Win-Win. Who said conservatives can’t find compromise?

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