Sen. Marco Rubio: Economy Shouldn't Come at Expense of Rising Sea Levels

The junior senator from Florida admitted that while sea levels are rising, the economy shouldn't come at its expense.

The junior senator from Florida appeared on CNN's "State of the Union" with Jake Tapper yesterday to respond to a new survey that claims that flooding will destroy one million Florida homes by the end of the century in wake of Hurricane Michael.

That report— titled "Underwater: Rising Seas, Chronic Floods, and the Implications for US Coastal Real Estate"— was released by the Union of Concerned Scientists last week. They found that one million homes would be at risk of being flooded fat the end of the century. That's pretty doom and gloom picture, no?

“Sea levels rise and changes in the climate, those are measurable. So I don’t think there is a debate whether that is happening … The secondary aspect of that is how much of that is due to human activity?" said Rubio.

He added, "No matter what we do, no matter what we do with laws, if tomorrow we stopped all -- let's say we went to all solar panels and did all that stuff, which is not realistic -- this trend would still continue."

He continued: "Look, Panama City looks like Homestead down here in South Florida after Andrew. What I saw there, I didn’t see any electricity polls standing, or any wires still up. So that’s going to have to be totally rebuilt. Telecommunications is still a challenge. Mexico Beach is wiped out, I mean literally flattened out. And then something I hope we don’t lose focus on – there are a lot of inland counties away from the coast, where there are a lot of older people, a lot of poor people, people that could not evacuate, even if they wanted to, living miles apart from each other in rural areas, who have been badly hit by this. And right now many of them are even cut off. They don’t have phones, the roads are blocked, they might even live off a dirt road. We’ve got to get to them too. That’s going to be the one area that I really, really focus on, because I think that’s where the dire need is also there. And they’re going to be the hardest people to identify and find. We still don’t have an accurate assessment of how many people we have cut off from everybody else."

These comments come after the devastation caused by Hurricane Michael in Florida's Panhandle.

What are your thoughts on Senator Rubio's comments? Weigh in below.

Comments
No. 1-10
Jonah_Kyle
Jonah_Kyle

And people actually though Rubio was the "better" conservative in the GOP primary.

Cbkitys
Cbkitys

Hurricanes are causing more damage because humanity keeps building more and more along the coastlines! There have been a number of bad storms thru history but a lot of them were not as devastating since they came ashore where few people lived! Climate change has nothing to do with this, it's what the atmosphere does and we aren't powerful enough to make it do what we want it too! We just need to deal with what's there!

58Edsel
58Edsel

In the beginning there was no dry land; only water that covered the "face" of the earth. God gathered the waters together and allowed "dry land" to appear. Without Him the water may once again come together and cover all the dry land. Consider that the gravitational pull impacts land more than water and the "dry land" is being drawn toward the center of this ball we call earth. That allows the sub-surface water to rise, actually forcing it to rise, joining the surface water and covering the land. Is there enough water to cover all the earth? God knows, scientists don't.

AJ_Liberty
AJ_Liberty

The problem is that there is just so many unknowns....climate modeling and prediction is hard...and very nonlinear. We could be a 100 years from catastrophe or we could be 1000's of years away from big problems. It's this modeling uncertainty that motivates both sides....will it turn out that the earth is more sensitive to greenhouse gasses.... some will take the gamble....others will not.

Some jump to apocalyptic scenarios.....which has the inverse effect....making it seem completely futile to do anything...especially since action hinges on navigating tricky cooperation between nations with seeming alternative motives. How much action is required when we truly don't understand the sensitivity of the climate on greenhouse gasses....it makes political action tough. Do we triple our cost of commuting...of heating or cooling our homes....how much of a reduction in our standard of living is acceptable....how much is required to make a discernible difference?

In this debate, I'm a proponent of buying some time. I like nuclear power as a stop-gap to more affordable future forms of energy. Yes there are risks, but modern plants are different from those of the 1960's. Let's do reasonable things with a healthy blend of market-based solutions. It is not un-conservative for the U.S. to become energy independent and divorce ourselves from Middle East oil. There are some paths that can garner consensus...I'm just not confident that there is enough good will.

MarkBerwind
MarkBerwind

“Sea levels rise and changes in the climate, those are measurable. So I don’t think there is a debate whether that is happening … The secondary aspect of that is how much of that is due to human activity?"

I've been going to the same place on the Atlantic coast, for the seafood, since I was six years old. I've not seen the slightest change in the sea level, there, in all that time, and I am 64 years old. The only thing I have noticed is what storms and tides do to rearrange the beaches. That's called erosion, and has nothing at all to do with the great myth about Global warming, climate change, or whatever some fool wants to call their political science. Marco Rubio should have kept his remarks to the damage of the hurricane. He just can't seem to shut up, when it comes to crossing that aisle in hopes of making himself into the "Statesman" he thinks he is. Take care of your state, Marco, and quit crossing into the twilight zone.