Princeton Students Need Help Knowing Who Wants to Dance with Them

Apparently, things have gotten a bit more complicated than the junior high school dances I remember attending.

Demonstrating that the left is taking all the fun out of parodies, which never seem to be able to outdo the absurdity embodied in the actual policies they’re meant to lampoon, Princeton University has issued an info-graphic helping all of their students (primarily those identifying as men, no doubt) know what consent looks like on the dance floor.

Yes, in anticipation of the school’s now-completed Orange and Black Ball, the Princeton Sexual Harassment/Assault Advising, Resources, and Education office published the guidelines for how you can know that a partner is wanting to dance with you.

Apparently, things have gotten a bit more complicated than the junior high school dances I remember attending where the boys would huddle on one side, the girls on the other. And the few times I got the courage to make that long walk across the floor to ask a would-be partner if she wanted to sway awkwardly back and forth to Bryan Adams’ “Everything I Do, I Do It For You” ballad, even with my adolescent mind I was able to properly interpret the laughter and running away to the bathroom in the opposite direction as a distinct and unqualified, “no.”

I guess college kids at this Ivy League school don’t quite possess the same powers of observation that most of us had in junior high school:

The post indicates that “Do you wanna dance?” is an appropriate opening, and that responses such as “Absolutely!,” “Yeah! Let’s do it!,” and “I’d love to!” are all ways of consenting to the question.

Beyond simply “asking & waiting for an answer,” the post also asserts that “frequently checking in with your dance partner” is required in order to maintain consent until the music stops, suggesting that the person who extended the invite periodically ask “Hey, are you still into this?” and volunteer that “We can stop if you aren’t.”

Is this for real? Are we really to the point that it has become incumbent upon one dancer (likely male) to repeatedly check in with the other dancer (likely female) to see if she wants to keep dancing? Do we now expect so little from each other that a person who is done dancing for whatever reason is not capable of just walking off the floor? And are we honestly so caught up in a victim-culture that we are creating a pretense for sexual harassment allegations to be brought against someone for continuing to dance with a partner who continued to dance with them, but later says that they were uncomfortable and wanted to stop?

Good grief.

I don’t even want to know how much money people in Princeton’s Sexual Harassment/Assault Advising, Resources, and Education office make. If it’s more than the parent chaperones who troll awkward 7th graders around the country at their winter formal, it’s too much.

Comments
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Jules
Jules

I'm trying to imagine dancing with someone who constantly nags me with questions about my state of mind. "Do you still want to keep dancing?" "Is this OK?" "Do you wan to stop now?" "How about now?" "Do you like dancing with me?" "Do you want to stop?" Yikes! So much for fun! And forget teasing, forget the games of playing hard to get so the guy would laughingly persist. That would not be considered sexual harassment these days, some would call it actual sexual assault. I am a woman, and I see all of this as the next step in unmanning men, emotionally castrating them. joseph23006 is right, ballroom dancing would be illegal, what with all that male-dominance in pushing a woman around and forcing her to dance backwards, spinning her and imposing his will upon her

thefirstRowdyone
thefirstRowdyone

If our college age persons are "snowflakes"; how do we characterize the parents who raised them to be snowflakes?

joseph23006
joseph23006

Continued: Obviously the rebellion of the 60s and 70s destroyed social graces and a real breakdown. Liberal views of just about everything gave us this and now they hide behind PC righteousness to hide their failure. Ballroom dancing could now be construed as an unwarranted contact, possibly sexist abuse!

joseph23006
joseph23006

Under the strict watch of the chaperone the young man extends a white gloved hand with a slight bow toward the young lady with hands in long white gloves folded demurely on her lap. "May I have this dance?" A glance to the chaperone who nods elicits, "You may!"