GOP: Our Brand Is…Confused Trans

Published in 1969 by Lawrence Peter, the Peter principle is a management theory that posits the selection of a candidate for a position is based on the candidate’s performance in their current role, rather than on abilities relevant to the intended role.

Employees are promoted a final time into jobs they cannot accomplish, and managers rise to the level of their incompetence.

The Republican Senate is a hot mess, and is a perfect example of the Peter Principle. The American citizenry chose to promote them to the role of majority party in part because of their excellence in being the minority party, and in part because they assumed the Republicans would be able to translate Obama resistance into actual political leadership.

But sadly, not so much. Their ineptitude is both confounding, and infuriating. But even more difficult to comprehend is their inability to understand even the simple principles of governing. They don’t seem to grasp the essentials of being a majority party: leadership, presenting a coherent message, and coalescing their members into a united body. These necessities seem to be far beyond their capabilities.

There are a myriad of issues within that august body, but chief among them is their inability to look beyond themselves in order to protect the brand and the party.

From the outside, the Republican party appears to be confused and uncertain as to their identity. They campaign on being conservatives, one even declared his desire to “build that dang wall”. They know all the conservative talking points, they even eagerly took the identity of Tea Party membership when necessary. Every website touts conservative this, and conservative that, but close examination reveals a true inner conflict.

For many Senate Republicans, it is apparent the talk of being Republican conservative is just that, talk. Conservatism is the hard outer shell, but if you were to take a look at the squishy center, you would see a Rockefeller republican, a moderate trans dying to compromise, aching for comity, desirous of the approval of the Democratic coastal elites, and jealous for preening media attention.

It is this dichotomy which so confuses these lifetime DC careerists. They know what is required of them, but when push comes to shove, that inner squish trans just aches to come out and play. More often than not, the insatiable urge to be part of the in-crowd is too hard to resist.

Just yesterday, Senate Intelligence Committee Chairman Richard Burr R-NC took it upon himself to throw House Intelligence Committee Chairman Devin Nunes R-Calif under the bus by defending Susan Rice. In his efforts to make nice with the Obama/Clinton crowd, he actually accused Rep. Nunes of creating the unmasking scandal. No word on his thoughts about the Russian scandal or the Steele Dossier though.

This past week, several Republican senators announced they couldn’t support the Repeal Obamacare bill. This, after they had voted for full repeal two years ago. It seems the 2015 vote to repeal Obamacare was based upon the sure knowledge then President Obama would veto it. But, with President Trump ready to sign a veto bill, sure enough, here comes that inner trans conflict. Another one bites the dust.

President Trump presented a conceptual budget to Congress, which was immediately denounced by his own party. Sen. Marco Rubio R-Fla in particular didn’t appreciate the cuts to the State Department and UN. Never mind the fact that this was a campaign promise by the Republican President. Never mind the fact that a bloated government is part and parcel of the entire swamp crisis.

Oh, McCain and Graham took great umbrage to the President’s budget as well. Not only was it light on State Department spending, there wasn’t enough war bucks for them. For those two, forget the $21 trillion deficit, we have to take democracy to the world, and if it takes war, then so be it.

It appears Sen. Mitch McConnell R-KY wants nothing more than to see the disappearance of the Republican President, failing that; seeing him weakened beyond effectiveness will suffice. Since President Trump took office, GOP senators have been taking pot shots at him, and consistently working at cross purposes with the White House. Sadly the Senate Majority Leader has done nothing to rein them in.

More disturbingly, the senate leadership even knew the Russia conspiracy was a mirage, a fallacy, yet through their silence has enabled both the MSM and Democrats to attack the President and his White House daily.

But to be fair, the Republican House of Representatives have been no better. Just this past week, 24 Republican House members actually voted to continue the practice of providing military funded transgender surgery. Their inner sympathies weren’t in conflict on that vote. Trans won again, to the tune of $130 thousand per surgery.

These House squishes also went to great lengths to defend the EPA, and denounce the President’s proposed budget cuts to that federal agency. This, regardless of EPA cuts being a centerpiece of his campaign promises.

But, if we were to only focus on the Senate and House, we would be remiss in identifying all of the confused trans members. The Justice Department is pushing an asset forfeiture program which should be an anathema to conservatives. For all of their flaunting of U.S. law, the Clintons and their coterie of courtiers will never be called accountable. The Justice Department has yet to rein in the deplorable intelligence leaks and seem more concerned about prosecuting marijuana violations than treason.

The list goes on, the IRS has yet to complete their work certifying the tax status for innumerable conservative non-profit organizations. The State Department is still dragging it’s feet on servicing the various Clinton FOIA request, not to mention Fast & Furious, and Benghazi. The Russians still own our uranium, and Bill, Hilary and Chelsea continue to raise money for a suspect non-profit.

At the end of the day, the Senate is supposed to provide party leadership. It is supposed to defend the President and promote the Republican brand. They are expected to understand the importance of fulfilling the President’s legislative agenda, and work cohesively for the good of the people. They are supposed to air their grievances in private, and work to compromise with their Republican brethren in order to further the conservative movement.

Benjamin Franklin famously said,

“If we don’t hang together, we shall surely hang separately.”

Most Republicans have done nothing to warrant reelection or even the right to remain in the majority. Perhaps the utter failure of the Democratic Party will allow them to maintain status quo, but right now, it is fair to say their performance won’t get them there.

But you never know, a return to the minority party just might quieten their confused trans.

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