A Profound Christian Statement on Dealing with Same-Sex Attraction

Jackie Hill Perry’s recently released book Gay Girl, Good God is a powerful manifesto of overcoming sin through Him.

For the longest time I have felt actively engaged and intricately involved in fighting the progressive left’s sexual revolution. I speak out (or write) frequently about the dangers of no-fault divorce, articulate why any sane society would recognize that pornography does not fall under the auspices of free speech or free expression, and have warned repeatedly that the demands of the LGBT political lobby will result in consequences damaging to all of us, gay people included.

It’s a culture war that was launched by the sexual revolutionaries dating back to Alfred Kinsey, joined by Hugh Hefner, adopted by Hollywood, and now commandeered by smear merchants like Dan Savage and dangerous activist groups like the Human Rights Campaign.

Though society only recognizes the highly popularized cultural side of this conflict, there is a soft underbelly that exists on the spiritual level. And only in the last year or two have I found myself withdrawing from the cultural battlefront while ramping up my efforts on the spiritual side. Not only do I find it much easier to address from that vantage point, I also believe it is the only avenue through which we can hope to have enduring success.

The spiritual tenor of a people will determine the culture. In other words, when your people turn rebellious spiritually, it is absurd to expect them to embrace moral good in their culture. That is surely where we are today, but there is hope in understanding the converse of this formula is just as true. When we fight this battle spiritually, and win spiritually, there will be a cultural effect. Far more triumphant, far more lasting, far more stable.

Along those lines, I have been asked more than once what resources I would recommend for those who want to articulate spiritual truth on this issue of same sex attraction. My standard response is anything from Rosaria Butterfield. Now, there is another. Jackie Hill Perry’s recently released book Gay Girl, Good God is a powerful manifesto of overcoming sin. For Perry, that sin was her same-sex attraction, but what I loved about the book was that it was all about God’s goodness, His faithfulness, His strength in helping flawed human beings find fulfillment.

This isn’t a story about how Jackie Perry became ex-gay through her own choices. It is a story about how God is faithful to people with same-sex attraction just as much as He is faithful to someone with urges towards other sinful conduct. While same-sex attraction may be a lifelong struggle, Perry commends and celebrates the sufficiency of Christ Jesus:

> “The crucified life is the life set on enduring until the end when, once for all, the cross is replaced with a crown…If Jesus needed strength to endure for the sake of obedience to his Father, how much more do we?”

Perry also reiterates what I think is the most crucial point for Christians to understand and articulate amidst a culture that celebrates same-sex attraction perhaps more than any other: “God isn’t calling gay people to be straight.” Bingo. This is about sinners finding fulfillment in Jesus rather than sin. As a sinner who has done that myself (albeit with a different manifestation of sin than those that Perry deals with), I can testify that complete deliverance from the urge or temptation is not immediate, and it is not imminent. The cross may be borne for a lifetime, but carrying it is our privilege as those in submission to Christ’s will over our own.

Perry ends her book with a note of triumph that should be read by every soul this side of eternity:

> “Our sexuality is not our soul, marriage is not heaven, and singleness is not hell. So may we all preach the news that is good for a reason. For it proclaims to the world that Jesus has come so that all sinners, same-sex attracted and opposite-sex attracted, can be forgiven of their sins to love God and enjoy Him forever.”

Amen. If I might be so bold, get the book, read it, and then pass it on.

Comments
No. 1-8
duke492
duke492

I totally agree. When I came to the church seeking, everyone preached to me about my heterosexual sin. It almost drove me away. I stayed because my salvation was more important. Sexual sin was one of the last things the Holy Spirit convicted me of. Scott Lively is an important voice in the battle against sexual sin. He says the homosexual movement is cultural Marxism. The Marxist philosopher Herbert Marcuse says that political and economic revolution is not enough. There must also be cultural revolution. If the forces of liberation are to prevail over the forces of domination and repression, the heterosexual, monogamous, patriarchal model of the Judeo-Christian family must be destroyed. Lively says the sexual revolution began during the 1940’s as a homosexual movement. Making little progress, thehomosexuals realized that they must first encourage heterosexual promiscuity.

Oregun
Oregun

Good post, Reminds me of a quote from Van Till " culture is religion exteralized". In other words people do what they really believe whatever they profess.

ForAllAmericans
ForAllAmericans

For the life of me I will never understand the right's desire to fight this particular issue of the culture wars. If you want to tell people in your church that homosexuality is a sin, then by all means go for it. But to put that message out into a world who probably doesn't agree with you, but then can look at who you just voted for president they will probably want to just laugh in your faces about the whole thing. I believe Jesus says something about taking care of what's in your eye before worrying about everyone else's.

TexasGrandma
TexasGrandma

Darrell B. Harrison: God's goal (with His children all) is eschatological not societal. How he works with us to overcome sin is one on one.....just like good parents work with their children....but God is the perfect parent!

AJ_Liberty
AJ_Liberty

How do we know if I turn away from sin if I did it because of my personal strength or because of Jesus' strength? This seems empirically untestable.

I'm not gay, but it seems like the proposition here is that a gay person must live celibate, give up physical intimacy, and perhaps companionship in exchange for "finding fulfillment in Jesus"....where we leave that poetry conveniently ill-defined. Since Jesus won't go out to dinner with you, drive you for your colonoscopy, or share life's sadness or happiness in any real way...meaning outside of one's head and imagination...the trade seems especially heartless....given the terms are being set by people who aren't gay.

I understand the gamble here....that Peter is just trying to save people's souls....by sharing the unquestioned truth from Leviticus. But maybe the reasons for ancient society rejecting homosexuality are not as relevant any more...we are no longer tribal...with the clan's strength depending on everyone reproducing. We are now able to see past the Bible's tacit acceptance of slavery as being a cultural anachronism....but with homosexuality we don't seem to give it a second thought....and frequently seem to let our own discomfort take precedence over perspective and humility over what if we don't quite have this right....