8829 members
Login

Trump Nearly Revoked The Visa Of A Chinese Dissident, A Move That Would Have Helped Steve Wynn

President Donald Trump was going to revoke the U.S. visa of Chinese businessman Guo Wengui after Steve Wynn, a billionaire whose Macau casino cannot operate without a license in the Chinese territory, passed on a letter from the Chinese government to Trump according to the Wall Street Journal.

President Donald Trump was going to revoke the U.S. visa of Chinese businessman Guo Wengui after Steve Wynn, a billionaire whose Macau casino cannot operate without a license in the Chinese territory, passed on a letter from the Chinese government to Trump according to the Wall Street Journal. Guo is a dissident of the Chinese government. Trump's aides had to talk the President out of the action as other agencies dealt with the situation. It appears Wynn took advantage of Trump's ignorance and used him for his own business interests.

The episode took a twist when President Donald Trump received a letter from the Chinese government, hand-delivered by Steve Wynn, a Las Vegas casino magnate with interests in the Chinese gambling enclave of Macau. Mr. Trump initially expressed interest in helping the Chinese government by deporting Mr. Guo, but other senior officials worked to block any such move, according to people familiar with the matter.

Trump was going to revoke Guo's visa on behalf of Wynn, who has business interests in Macau. Wynn hand delivered a letter from the Chinese government to Trump.

The document had been presented to Mr. Trump at a recent private dinner at the White House, the people said. It was hand-delivered to the president by Mr. Wynn, the Republican National Committee finance chairman, whose Macau casino empire cannot operate without a license from the Chinese territory.

When seeing the letter was from fellow casino billionaire Steve Wynn, Trump acted immediately.

“Where’s the letter that Steve brought?” Mr. Trump called to his secretary. “We need to get this criminal out of the country,” Mr. Trump said, according to the people. Aides assumed the letter, which was brought into the Oval Office, might reference a Chinese national in trouble with U.S. law enforcement, the people said. The letter, in fact, was from the Chinese government, urging the U.S. to return Mr. Guo to China.

false