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Human Rights Attorney Asserts That Trump Was Bailed Out By Russian Organized Crime

Scott Horton, human rights lawyer and a professor of at Columbia University School of Law, asserts that Russian organized crime figures connected to Vladimir Putin bailed Trump out following his last bankruptcy. (image credit: Youtube/The Guardian)

Scott Horton, human rights lawyer and a professor of at Columbia University School of Law, asserts that Russian organized crime figures connected to Vladimir Putin bailed Trump out following his last bankruptcy.Horton is also a partner at the one of the largest law firms in the world. Horton's work in the region goes back to Andrei Sakharov.

Via Scott Horton:

Via Scott Horton:

The financing for Trump's real estate came entirely from Russian sources. Trump was persona non grata to global banking following his last bankruptcy. Trump's inability to fund his projects made him turn to Russian sources. With Trump, the Russians saw an opportunity to launder their money. Horton also alleges that Trump had a seventh bankruptcy.

The money to build these projects flowed almost entirely from Russian sources. In other words, after his business crashed, Trump was floated and made to appear to operate a successful business enterprise through the infusion of hundreds in millions of cash from dark Russian sources. He was their man.

Who is Semion Mogilevich?

Mogilevich is considered the godfather of Russian organized crime. He is an ally of Russian President Vladimir Putin.

Drug trafficking, trading nuclear material, contract murders, and international prostitution — that's how the Federal Bureau of Investigation believes Semion Mogilevich, one of its top 10 most wanted fugitives, has spent his time over the last few decades. Indicted in 2003 for countless fraud charges, Mogilevich now primarily lives in Moscow.

The Financial Times asserts that Trump received financing from fraud schemes and organized crime.

Over the years the US presidential candidate has assembled an eclectic collection of backers and collaborators. Some had chequered pasts, with links to organised crime or fraud schemes. But perhaps the biggest risk for Mr Trump’s complex, often opaque, business empire was that it might be used for a purpose US officials fear is rife in the country’s real estate sector: laundering dirty money.

Why is real estate a good vehicle to launder money?

The laws regulating US real estate deals are scant, experts say. Provisions against terrorism financing in the Patriot Act, passed in the aftermath of the September 11 2001 attacks, obliged mortgage lenders to conduct “know your customer” research. But money launderers pay in cash. Sales such as those of the Trump Soho apartments have passed through this loophole, which was partially closed only this year.

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