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2018 NFL Draft: Picks 196-200

--- NFLDraftScout.com ---

196 Chiefs: CB Tremon Smith

SUMMARY: A no-star athlete recruit out of high school, Tremon “Tre” Smith was a two-way player at Saks, starring at quarterback (school-record for career touchdowns) and cornerback (four interceptions in 2013). He enrolled at FCS-level Central Arkansas and earned a starting role as a sophomore, starting all 36 games the past three seasons. Smith had outstanding ball production with 53 passes defended and 15 interceptions over his career (both school-records). He was also UCA’s featured punt returner the last two years, averaging 7.6 yards per return with one score. Smith has outstanding play speed, fluidity and ball-tracking skills, making plays on the ball when there. However, he struggles to pattern match and allows excess separation out of route breaks. He is lean-framed and can be out-physicaled. Overall, Smith is speedy with ball skills and return value, but will need to improve the technical and mental parts of his game to compete vs. NFL wide receivers.

197 Redskins: Shaun Dion Hamilton

Analysis
STRENGTHS
Very quick and athletic, Hamilton possesses the ability to make plays behind the line of scrimmage. Gets downhill fast and is very effective blitzing and creating quarterback pressures. He possesses superb closing speed on quarterbacks and ball carriers, with excellent tackling technique. He fills his gaps consistently and rarely is caught out of position. Hamilton shows explosiveness on contact and appears to relish in making the big hit. He is athletic enough to drop in coverage with the hips and ability of a safety. - Bo Marchionte 1/31/2018

WEAKNESSES
Injuries are definitely and concern, especially when considering his less than ideal frame and strong penchant for punishing opponents. Hamilton has been unable to finish his last two seasons of college football healthy. His smallish size, should not limit NFL teams coveting his over all skill set, due to a lot of hybrid linebacker/safeties becoming vogue in the league. Hamilton will need to learn to use his hands better to shed opponents and make plays at the next level. - Bo Marchionte 1/31/2018

COMPARES TO
Deion Jones, Falcons - Jones was a second-round selection by the Falcons in the 2016 NFL Draft out of Louisiana State. Agile and quick to strike make Jones a valuable commodity in Atlanta Head Coach's Dan Quinn's defensive scheme. Hamilton has a larger frame and provides more pressure on quarterbacks, rather than Jones stellar ability to stop the run.

198 Chiefs: Kahlil McKenzie Jr.

Analysis
STRENGTHS
Looks the part of an NFL defensive tackle with a hulking, well-distributed frame including broad shoulders, wide hips and thick limbs. Can overwhelm opponents with his girth and power, tossing aside smaller opponents, on occasion, and dragging down ballcarriers with one arm while still fighting with would-be blockers. Can generate impressive power on the bull rush when he keeps his pads low, showing an explosive pop with his hands and the leg drive to bulldoze blockers deep into the backfield. Possesses the length to hamper the vision of quarterbacks, Light on his feet for such a large man, showing balance and coordination when pursuing laterally and downfield. Excellent bloodlines with both his father (Reggie) and uncle (Raleigh) former standouts at Tennessee and NFL players with eight and 15 year careers at linebacker and offensive line, respectively... Expected to work out well. Appears to be just scratching the surface of his potential. -- Rob Rang 1/31/2018

WEAKNESSES
Reliant on his physical tools at this time, showing limited development over his three seasons at Tennessee. Though he may run well for a man of his size during drills, too often McKenzie appears sluggish off the snap, too often being the last defensive lineman off the ball. Further, he negates his own strength by standing up as he rushes upfield. He shows limited coordination between his hands and feet as a pass rusher, producing his best efforts with a simple bull rush which is only effective when he maintains proper pad level. Perhaps reflection of his limited playing time, McKenzie shows below average awareness of the football, too often losing track of it as he rushes upfield. - Rob Rang 1/31/2018

COMPARES TO
John Jenkins, Bears - Jenkins flashed rather than dominated in two seasons at Georgia but his rare combination of size, strength and speed earned him the No. 82 overall pick in 2013 and he has quietly carved out five years in the NFL since despite never registering more than 26 tackles in any single season. The NFL is a big man's game and McKenzie - like Jenkins - possesses the raw traits scouts covet.

IN OUR VIEW
McKenzie was not the difference-maker former Tennessee head coach Butch Jones was hoping for when he lured the much ballyhooed prospect out of the state of California but make no mistake, the imposing defensive tackle possesses the raw traits which could earn him a late round selection, nevertheless. Whether it turns out to be true or not, the perception is that McKenzie offers untapped potential, which teams are often willing to gamble on in Day Three with other, more polished and productive (but less gifted) prospects left hoping to sign as undrafted free agents.

199 Titans: QB Luke Falk

Analysis
STRENGTHS
Excellent timing and touch passer. Delivers catchable balls – high completion percentage passer in college. Hits receivers in stride to create catch-and-run opportunities. Subtle quickness in the pocket to buy extra half-seconds. Tough scrambler and will fight for extra yards. Highly productive collegiate career, setting the Pac-12 records for career passing yards (14,481), career passing touchdowns (119), and career completions (1,403). Earned his way as a former walk-on, winning the 2017 Burlsworth Trophy. Nose always in the playbook. Dedicated himself to the program “probably more than most people will ever realize,” according to Mike Leach. – Dane Brugler 12/30/2017

WEAKNESSES
Lacks the arm strength to add RPMs when needed – his fastball is more of a change-up for most NFL passers. Doesn’t trust his arm to fit the ball into tight windows. Inconsistent anticipation, leading to closed routes. Hesitant and holds the ball much too long. Indecisive eyes, especially when rushed with pressure. Takes too many hits and appears gun shy after a few pressures. Mistakes tend to linger – benched twice as a senior due to ineffective stretches. Lean, lanky body type, leading to durability concerns – missed the 2017 bowl game with a left wrist injury. Not a rush threat due to average athleticism and stiff lower body. Benefited from a system offense and his high completion percentage reflects high volume of underneath throws. Comfortable with a small town vibe and might not find comfort in a big market team. – Dane Brugler 12/30/2017

IN OUR VIEW:
Falk has some workable NFL traits with his touch, toughness and intelligence, but he lacks the arm and anticipation to be a tight-windowed passer and will need time to learn a NFL offense to stay on a roster.

200 Falcons: OLB Foyesade Oluokun

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