My gripe is that wind generation has a low capacity factor and non-dispatchability. Wind requires that 100% conventional backup power always be on standby. This increases the capital cost of constructing a reliable power system as a whole and lengthens the payback time for the system as a whole, since the savings on conventional fuel cost must be amortized over both wind farm and conventional power plant construction instead of conventional plant cost only.

If battery technology improves enough to make long life, high energy density electric storage economic for transportation use then that same technology may also make grid-scale electric storage economic. If that storage technology is inexpensive enough, then intermittent generation such as wind might actually start replacing conventional power generation instead of only augmenting it.

Funny how wind power is so cheap and yet every country that's installed a lot of wind power has had their electricity prices increase massively. Denmark, Australia, Germany, the UK...

Funny how Texas installed huge amounts of wind power and their electricity price (not power, typo corrected) did not increase. Besides, things have changed. Wind power cost has come down sharply in the last few years, and now it's cost-competitive to traditional energy sources.

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Trader said " Texas installed huge amounts of wind power and their electricity power did not increase." Yes, very strange, you would think with huge amounts of wind power, they would get more power!