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FOURTH OF JULY CRAFTS: {KID MADE} PATRIOTIC JEWELRY

Are you ready for some great Fourth of July crafts?

by Ness

We’ve got lots of great “kid made” projects coming up over the next week. We at Kids Activities Blog hope your child enjoys celebrating the fourth with this great patriotic jewelrycraft.

FOURTH OF JULY CRAFTS

Threading pieces of drinking straws onto string to make jewelry is a classic kids craft. This red, white and blue version would make great Fourth of July crafts for a kids party. Kids could also make them as gifts for friends.

This fun and simple patriotic craft is wonderful for fine motor skills as it involves threading. It’s also a great sequencing activity (early math skill) as the straws are threaded on in a red, white and blue sequence.

KID MADE

To make a patriotic necklace you will need:

Red, white and blue drinking straws

String or cord for threading

A pair of scissors

DIY NECKLACE

Cut the straws into even lengths to form the “beads” of the necklace. If you want to follow a pattern when you are threading the pieces of straw, then it is helpful to keep the three colors separated in different dishes. It will just make things quicker and easier when it comes time to do the threading.

PATRIOTIC JEWELRY

Cut a length of string and tie a knot at one end. This will prevent the pieces of straw from sliding off the string as you begin to thread them on. Now you are ready to begin threading the straw pieces on to the cord. My son threaded his in a red, white and blue pattern but it would look just as great threading them on in a random order.

When you have finished threading the straw pieces on to the string, tie together the two ends of the string and enjoy your patriotic jewelry. You don’t have to stop at a necklace either. Why not make a matching bracelet?

MORE KIDS ACTIVITIES

What are your child’s favorite Fourth of July crafts? Kid made projects always make a holiday more meaningful to kids. For more great kids activities, take a look at these other ideas from Kids Activities Blog:

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