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Man Starts Attempting Arrests, Claiming 8-Hour Online Course Gave Him Authority

A police impersonator who was involved in a collision had put the other driver in handcuffs before real police arrived.

Chantilly, VA – Police arrived at the scene of a car crash on Wednesday to find one of the drivers had already been put in handcuffs.

The other driver, Arta Javanbakhtamarlouei, told police he felt threatened by man, so he used the authority he claimed he had after taking an eight-hour criminal justice course to put the other driver under arrest, WUSA reported.

The accident occurred just before 5:45 p.m. on May 9th near the intersection of Jackson Memorial Highway and Elmwood Street in Chantilly.

Javanbakhtamarlouei's claims of law enforcement authority didn't go over well when actual police officers arrived.

Fairfax police arrested Javanbakhtamarlouei and charged him with impersonating a law enforcement officer, WUSA reported.

Javanbakhtamarlouei, 33, had acquired and carried many of the tools of the police trade at the time of his arrest. He was wearing a duty belt that had pouches, pepper spray, and a holstered firearm replica that looked genuine.

Police said that the firearm was actually a BB gun, and the police impersonator told them he had purchased all of his supplies online, according to WUSA.

Officers found that Javanbakhtamarlouei was carrying two badges at the time of his arrest.

One was a concealed weapon permit badge that was available online for $20, and doesn't actually grant authority to carry a concealed weapon. The second badge was for a private investigator, and police said they believed he got it from a previous job.

Javanbakhtamarlouei had not worked a legitimate job in four years, WUSA reported.

After the incident, Fairfax PD offered tips to the community on how to verify a legitimate officer.

WUSA reported that if someone isn’t sure that the officer they are engaged with is legitimate, the person should call 911.

A dispatchers can confirm whether the officer on the scene is legitimate over the phone.

Wow, what a dumbass. I am glad I don’t have to write that report with that guys last name!

13

Did he claim to be a police officer? Evidence of criminal intent?

Hey stupid, intent is not required to make an arrest. Isn't today the day for you to die? Please? I'll give you a dollar.

6

"Badges? We don't need no steenkin' badges!"

10

LOL!

3

Actions speak louder than words. Sounds like you took the same online class as this idiot.

Virginia Law 18-2-174 Any person who falsely assumes or exercises the functions, powers, duties, and privileges incident to the office of sheriff, police officer, marshal, or other peace officer, or any local, city, county, state, or federal law-enforcement officer, or who falsely assumes or pretends to be any such officer, is guilty of a Class 1 misdemeanor. A second or subsequent offense is punishable as a Class 6 felony. He's lucky they didn't charge him with false imprisonment.

5

I believe that any private citizen can make a "citizen's arrest", but I think the rules vary by state. That does not give those citizens the right to falsely assume authority. Big difference!

This is one of those guys that should be locked up for a long time....

If he gets locked up he better not tell the other inmates he's a cop. That would not go well at all. 😄

That's the problem, no evidence of false assumption of authority. And playing dress up is not a crime, or cops would be in trouble.

No evidence except for the fact he admitted it right? Are you retarded or did you just not read the article? Also someone literally just quoted the law word for word. You are talking out your ass buddy.

The Keystone Cop (or so he thought!)

1

"The Keystone Cop (or so he thought!)" The blue gang does not like competition.

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