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A Look At Weapons Inside Las Vegas Shooter's Hotel Room And Modified Weapons

Details are starting to emerge of what was in the hotel room Stephen Paddock booked in Las Vegas.

Las Vegas shooter Stephen Paddock hauled 10 suitcases over several days up to this 32nd-floor room when he checked in Thursday before his shooting spree that would kill 59 people and injured more than 500 others.

The shooter fired bullets into crowds of 22,000 people outside his hotel window on Sunday. Paddock fired 280 rounds in 31 seconds at one point of the shooting spree.

Those are some of the details emerging in a New York Post article about the hotel room used by the 64-year-old Paddock, a former accountant.

TV reporter Jacqui Heinrich posted two of the pictures of the guns on her Twitter account.

“EXCLUSIVE: these are 2 of 23 guns found in #LasVegas shooter’s hotel room at #MandalayBay – hammer, bipod, optics, ammo. 59 lives. Chilling,” she tweeted.

Investigators also found 19 more guns at Paddock’s home in Mesquite, Nevada, along with thousands of rounds of ammunition.

The New York Post said it had footage of an rifle resting on a bipod on the floor.

Some of the high-powered weapons found in the room included an AR-15, an AK-47, four Daniel Defense DDM4 rifles, three FN-15s and other unidentified rifles made by Sig Sauer, the NY Post reported.

At least one of the guns had been modified with a legal “bump stock,” (gun in photo on the right) which makes a semi-automatic rifle capable of firing as a sort or simulated full-auto mode by using recoil to force the shooter's trigger finger to repeatedly pull the trigger.

“The devices, which are legal in the US, alter the gun’s stock so the recoil helps accelerate how quickly the shooter can pull the trigger,” the NY Post reported. “Some of the weapons may have been converted to fully automatic, according to reports. Automatic weapons have been banned for civilian use since the Firearm Owners’ Protection Act of 1986.”

It's still legal to possess fully-automatic firearms that were manufactured prior to the ban.

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