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Cocks or Glocks? Choose wisely. Chose now!

For some reason, a dildo protest happening in the heart of Texas by a bunch of millennials resonated with the crowd...

Cocks Not Glocks - A raunchier take on the quip, Hugs Not Drugs, and a phrase that rings a faint bell in the back of minds that caught wind of UT Campus Carry protest almost three years ago. “Oh yeah, the Dildo Protest,” they nod and smirk, as their eyes refocus on mine. Relieved to know they’ve heard of that much, I exhale. Now, here comes the pitch.

In August of 2016, the Campus Carry law went into effect at the University of Texas in Austin. In response, thousands of dildos were handed out by four young women on the first day of the fall semester to protest the law. Fighting absurdity with absurdity, the women cited the Texas penal code to highlight the prejudice in outlawing the open carry of sex toys, while permitting the concealed carry of a handgun in a student’s backpack into university buildings. This demonstration generated a strange confluence of sex-positivity pioneers, gun violence prevention activists, and Campus Carry advocates. Most importantly, however, it drew in the average American through its pure spectacle, causing us all to beg two questions: Why do we have guns on college campuses? And why do we have such restrictive laws regarding sex toys? For many on campus that day, the event was a manifestation of the analogy between the gun and the phallus. And like so many strange happenings in this age, it was all because of the internet.

October of 2015, Jessica Jin, a UT graduate, made the Facebook event that would forever alter the course of her 24-year-old life. Campus (Dildo) Carry, the pithy, irreverent and bold brainchild of Jessica, urged people to tie “giant, swinging dildos” onto their backpacks as a South Park-esque commentary upon Texas gun laws sneaking into UT’s liberal campus. She invited friends and posted it on a few UT groups, delighting in a solid troll, and then went to bed. What really brought the satirical Facebook event to life was the 10,000 people that RSVP’d, commented and shared the event, summoning it out of the internet and into IRL.

I remember musing over the sprawl of commentary as I scrolled down the event page. For some reason, a dildo protest happening in the heart of Texas by a bunch of millennials didn’t faze or surprise me much- it was really only a matter of time. However, for the many others that singed the discussion section with comments of hate, misogyny, and racism, this protest touched on something that was deeply offensive to them. Whether it was guns, or sex, or young women speaking their minds, they made it clear in the vitriol they typed—and that fascinated me. So much so, I decided to make a documentary about it.

Fast forward about 10 months, and I’m chasing down Jessica Jin in a crowd of hundreds in UT’s designated Free Speech zone, the West Mall, as the protest is in full swing. My producer, David, has the camera and I need him to track Jessica as she hustles through the masses, cheering people on, holding up her fuchsia dildo, and trying not to look exhausted from the week of protest prep finally come to fruition.

Fast forward almost two years. Trump is president, and demonstrations like Cocks Not Glocks have become a monthly occurrence. The major themes of this small movement at UT were just the beginning of a cultural overhaul that would bubble up and surface into the collective American conscience over the course of the last year. The #MeToo movement and March For Our Lives have dominated our national news, thrusting the film industry, gun laws, and the youth of Generation Z into the spotlight. This documentary, I hope, will speak to this current spirit of activism, of cultural questioning and reckoning, especially in regard to young women defining their own meaning of safety in our country. This film, at the end of the day, is about these four young women, discovering and defining who they are, as they grow a small movement out of nothing.

We’re still in the fundraising processes with this film and could use any support we can get. If you’d like to support this project, as well as a first-time, female filmmaker, pledge to the Cocks Not Glocks: A Documentary campaign on Kickstarter before Thursday, May 31st at 8 a.m. (Eastern Time)

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