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Report: Taxpayers funding government officials’ revenge porn habits

Several government IP addresses, including one linked to the Executive Office, accessed popular revenge porn site.

Anon-IB is a revenge porn site where users can anonymously post or share nude or sexually explicit photos, usually women, and generally posted without the subject’s consent. Users also have the capacity to search for photos of subjects by state or area, and they can even request photos of individuals.

Anon-IB users “trade nudes like baseball cards,” and this charming site is frequently visited from government IP addresses, specifically computers linked to the Senate, the Navy, and even one from the Executive Office.

Although user to the site post, search, and share anonymously, a Norwegian security analyst was able pull hundreds of thousands of IP addresses that can show where the Anon-IB user is searching or posting from. It’s not possible to pinpoint the identity of the specific user, only that the site was accessed from a government network.

Someone from a Senate registered address asked for nudes of female D.C. worker, and another asked for user to find photos of a girl they went to college with. The user from the Executive Office named the woman in the posted photo stating, “I have wins if anyone is ready to post. First one is free.”

Even though the Navy has branded the posting of nude photos a criminal offense, people using Navy computers continue to access the revenge porn site. Users have asked for and shared pictures of fellow servicewomen, military spouses, and women working with the NSA.

Stolen photos, nonconsensual images, and revenge porn have become a real problem in recent years. So much so that senators are trying to pass legislation to fight the “revenge-porn crisis,” but maybe they need to quit trying to “find some wins” on Anon-IB first.

Want more info? Read the full article “Top U.S. Government Computers Linked to Revenge-Porn SiteTop U.S. Government Computers Linked to Revenge-Porn Site” by Joseph Cox posted at The Daily Beast on January 11, 2018.

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